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Flu

Flu Season Has Arrived: Get Vaccinated to #FightFlu

Make sure you #FightFlu all season long by practicing the CDC Take 3 Actions to Fight the Flu: 1) Get a flu vaccine, 2) Take everyday preventative actions to stop the spread of germs, and 3) Take flu antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them.

ID News Round-Up

Recent items of interest from the world of infectious diseases including the latest influenza vaccine recommendations, new policies from AAP to boost childhood immunization rates, new guidelines for the treatment of common sexually transmitted diseases, Zika in the US, and the FDA ban on some common antibacterial ingredients in soaps and body washes.

Vaccination for Healthcare Professionals

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that all healthcare professionals receive hepatitis B, influenza, Tdap, MMR, and varicella vaccinations, to reduce the chances of contracting or spreading vaccine-preventable diseases.

Working Towards a Universal Influenza Vaccine

A universal influenza vaccine would be an exciting new advancement and would revolutionize a vaccination strategy that has remained largely unchanged for over 50 years. An attractive future is on the rise in which an individual would need to receive only two vaccinations over his or her lifetime to protect against the many commonly circulating influenza virus strains, as well as possible emergent pandemic strains.

Advocating for Flu Vaccination in Schools

Immunizations are a modern marvel of public health! And among the advocates on the front lines are school nurses. School nurses are more than just compliance experts for school-required immunizations; they also provide timely and accurate information to improve the health in one of our most important communities…schools.

How Social Networks Can Influence Flu Vaccination Decisions

While vaccination rates continue to rise each year, common flu vaccine myths that keep people from vaccinating persist and are often shared among social media networks. Therefore, one of the most important things we can do to prevent the spread of flu (besides getting vaccinated, of course) is to use our own social media influence to counter the prolific misinformation and refer people to reputable immunization resources.

Stay Healthy During the Holidays

Pregnant women are at increased risk for complications, and even death, from the flu. It’s our job as healthcare advocates to communicate that message to our members, family, and friends.

Common Questions From Parents About Flu Vaccines

Vaccination remains the most important step we can all take to protect ourselves (and others) against flu and its complications. The vaccine is safe, does not cause the flu, and helps to limit the chances of getting the flu and spreading it to others.