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Flu Vaccines

We’ve Come A Long Way: Trends in Flu Vaccination

The first recorded worldwide influenza epidemic happened in 1580, more than 430 years ago. The outlook for preventing influenza remained bleak for 350 years until the first influenza virus strain was isolated in a laboratory in 1933, and the work began to create an effective vaccine…

Improving Lagging Flu Vaccination Rates Among the 65+ Population

Patients should be vaccinated with any available approved influenza vaccine, even if their first choice of vaccine type is not available. CDC states (and I wholeheartedly agree) that it is far better to vaccinate at the first opportunity with whichever vaccine is available than to delay. A vaccine deferred is often a vaccine never received.

ABC News, CDC, & NFID Chat About Flu on Twitter

In partnership with NFID and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Richard Besser, MD chief health and medical editor at ABC News, recently hosted a live tweet chat on influenza (flu) prevention. Participating medical experts encouraged everyone six months and older to #GetVaccinated annually to help #FightFlu.

Flu Season Has Arrived: Get Vaccinated to #FightFlu

Make sure you #FightFlu all season long by practicing the CDC Take 3 Actions to Fight the Flu: 1) Get a flu vaccine, 2) Take everyday preventative actions to stop the spread of germs, and 3) Take flu antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them.

Advocating for Flu Vaccination in Schools

Immunizations are a modern marvel of public health! And among the advocates on the front lines are school nurses. School nurses are more than just compliance experts for school-required immunizations; they also provide timely and accurate information to improve the health in one of our most important communities…schools.

How Social Networks Can Influence Flu Vaccination Decisions

While vaccination rates continue to rise each year, common flu vaccine myths that keep people from vaccinating persist and are often shared among social media networks. Therefore, one of the most important things we can do to prevent the spread of flu (besides getting vaccinated, of course) is to use our own social media influence to counter the prolific misinformation and refer people to reputable immunization resources.

Common Questions From Parents About Flu Vaccines

Vaccination remains the most important step we can all take to protect ourselves (and others) against flu and its complications. The vaccine is safe, does not cause the flu, and helps to limit the chances of getting the flu and spreading it to others.

Can A Flu Vaccine Give You The Flu?

Have you ever talked with someone who told you they don’t get the influenza vaccine because it gave them the flu? Is this a reason that you personally don’t get the influenza vaccine for yourself or family members?