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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Vaccine Storage and Handling Really Matters

A special thank you to Kelly L. Moore, MD, MPH, Director of the Tennessee Immunization Program at the Tennessee Department of Health, for this interview on the importance of proper vaccine storage and handling. For additional tips and strategies on vaccine storage and handling, register to attend the NFID Fall 2014 Clinical Vaccinology Course in Houston, TX on November 7-9, 2014. To join the…

Disease Outbreaks at All Time High

Vaccines are one of the greatest public health accomplishments. They have saved tens of millions of lives since their introduction and have led to the elimination, or near-elimination, of numerous infectious diseases. However, in recent years, vaccination rates have decreased and many of the diseases close to elimination are now making a comeback. Some attribute the high number of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks to the anti-vaccine…

Addressing the Challenges of Meningococcal Disease Outbreaks on Campuses

Recent outbreaks of serogroup B meningococcal disease on US college campuses have heightened awareness about the lack of licensed vaccines in the US to protect against this serious and sometimes fatal infection. The increased focus on the challenges of facing this unpredictable disease and the need for an effective and timely public health response when outbreaks occur, led the National Foundation for Infectious…

5 Summer Travel Vaccination Tips for Adults

Are you planning an overseas vacation this summer? Depending on the destination, you may need to think about recommended vaccines for you and your kids. Here are a few tips you should keep in mind to ensure that vaccine-preventable diseases do not stand in the way of your summer fun. See a healthcare provider: Your healthcare provider is the best…

Five Important Reasons to Vaccinate Your Child

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has designated April 26-May 3, 2014 as National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW), an annual observance highlighting the importance of protecting infants from vaccine-preventable diseases and celebrating the achievements of immunization programs and their partners in promoting healthy communities. Celebrating its 20th anniversary, NIIW has served as a call to action for parents, caregivers, and healthcare…

8 Things Everyone Should Know About Antibiotic Resistance

Every year in the US, more than 2 million people get infections that are resistant to antibiotics and at least 23,000 people die as a result. Taking an antibiotic when it is not needed can lead to the development of antibiotic resistance. Each time someone takes unnecessary antibiotics, they increase their risk of developing an infection that may be resistant to…

Adult Immunization: Are YOU Meeting the Standards for Patient Care?

Special thanks to Carolyn B. Bridges, MD, Associate Director of Adult Immunizations, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Services, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, for providing this guest blog post. Vaccination is a critical preventive health measure. Making sure your patients are up-to-date on vaccines recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) gives them the best protection…

It’s Not Too Late to Vaccinate!

This is the time of year that influenza activity typically starts to pick up in the US. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 25 states are now reporting widespread seasonal flu activity, with the most severe activity located in the Southeastern states, and six pediatric flu deaths reported since September.  You can track flu activity in your state…

Top 10 Reasons to Get Vaccinated

As the 2013 National Influenza Vaccination Week wraps up, it’s important to remember these top 10 reasons to get vaccinated against flu. 1. It’s your responsibility to protect your family. The best way to protect your family from influenza, or flu, is by getting everyone in your household vaccinated. Even the healthiest child who’s never had seasonal influenza is at risk and needs…

Seniors among Groups Hardest Hit by Flu

For most people, getting the flu means feeling achy and feverish for a week or so, but for people 65 years and older, the flu can be much more serious. People in this age group are at high risk for severe flu illness and complications. In fact, an estimated 60 percent of flu-related hospitalizations in the US occur in this…

Pregnant Women and Infants – Targets for the Flu

Pregnancy is a time for big changes—a whirlwind of emotion, anticipation, and uncertainty. But one thing that is certain during this time is the importance of getting a vaccine to help protect both the pregnant woman and her baby against influenza (flu). Flu is a contagious illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and lungs. Pregnant women with the flu have a…

Misperceptions Hinder Flu Prevention and Treatment Efforts

The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) recently conducted a national Flu Behaviors and Treatment survey to understand public attitudes, experiences, and knowledge about flu prevention and treatment. The survey found that while most US adults understand that flu is serious (93%) and highly contagious (87%) and know the importance of annual flu vaccination (66%), only one-fourth (27%) would call a doctor for advice…