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Facts About HPV Vaccination

HCP FAQ snip

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends 11- to 12-year-olds get two doses of HPV vaccine to protect against cancers caused by HPV. The second dose should be given 6-12 months after the first dose. Those who initiate the vaccination series after age 15 years as well as those who are immunocompromised should receive three doses.

Both males and females up to age 26 years who were not adequately vaccinated should receive catch-up HPV vaccination.

Adults age 27-45 years should talk to a healthcare professional about whether HPV vaccination is right for them. Shared clinical decision-making is recommended because some individuals who are not adequately vaccinated might benefit from vaccination.

View additional information on the CDC recommendations.

Resources

Genital HPV Infection Fact Sheet

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Fact sheet with information on HPV vaccine recommendations and the link between HPV and cancer

HPV: Fast Facts

American Sexual Health Association (ASHA): Statistics about HPV prevalence, transmission, and its effects including cancer and genital warts

HPV Vaccine – Questions & Answers

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Answers questions about why HPV vaccine is needed, the differences between available vaccines, who should get the vaccine and when, considerations for pregnant women, and paying for the vaccine

HPV Vaccine is Safe

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Fact sheet on the safety of HPV vaccines

Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG)

Human Papillomavirus (HPV): Questions and Answers

Immunization Action Coalition (IAC): Detailed FAQs about HPV, HPV vaccination, vaccine dosing, who should receive the vaccine and when, safety, and insurance coverage

National HPV Vaccination Roundtable

Coalition of public, private, and voluntary organizations and experts dedicated to reducing incidence of and mortality from HPV cancers in the US

Put “HPV Cancer Prevention” on your Back-to-School Checklist

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Information about HPV for parents/guardians

What are the Benefits of HPV Vaccines?

American Cancer Society (ACS)

What is HPV?

American Cancer Society (ACS)

National HPV Vaccination Roundtable

Coalition of public, private, and voluntary organizations and experts dedicated to reducing incidence of and mortality from HPV cancers in the US

Put “HPV Cancer Prevention” on your Back-to-School Checklist

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Information about HPV for parents/guardians

HPV Vaccines: Vaccinating Your Preteen or Teen

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Frequently asked questions guide for parents of teenage boys and girls

Human Papillomavirus–Associated Cancers — United States, 2008–2012

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR)

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

National Cancer Institute: Fact Sheet

Middle School Health Starts Here

National HPV Vaccination Roundtable

Cervical Cancer Screening

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): What you should know about cervical cancer screening

Genital HPV Infection Fact Sheet

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Fact sheet with information on HPV vaccine recommendations and the link between HPV and cancer

HPV Vaccine Information for Young Women – Fact Sheet

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Information about who should receive HPV vaccines and when


Additional Resources